Can Landslides Harm Pipelines?

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Can Landslides Harm Pipelines?

Landslides are a constant threat to many pipeline sites. Landslides, mudflows, earth slumps, rockfalls, and other types of slope failures threaten job sites in many terrains, not just hills or mountains. They can be fast or slow, wet or dry, small or large, shallow or deep, and reactivated or new. Because of the long, linear

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The Pipeline Industry is Constantly Changing

The pipeline industry has been at the forefront of innovation and technological change for many decades. From finding new ways to safeguard the integrity of pipelines and reduce their environmental footprint to getting the best value for our resources, pipeline companies continue to make their mark innovating as part of their commitment to continuous improvement.

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3 Pipeline Innovations You Need to Know About

From finding new ways to safeguard the integrity of pipelines and reduce their environmental footprint to getting the best value for their resources, pipeline companies continue to make their mark innovating as part of their commitment to continuous improvement. Here are some ways pipeline companies are monitoring for safety and efficacy. High Fidelity Dynamic Sensing

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Protecting Pipelines in the Winter

Spring is around the corner, and it can change work conditions on your pipeline work site. Temporary erosion and sediment control measures installed during frozen conditions may not remain functional under thaw conditions. This means you may need a few more measures in place for snowmelt and extra rain during the warmer months. When choosing

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How Technology Advances Have Made Safer Pipelines

As technology has evolved over the years, so has safety, efficiency, and environmental performance, impacting every dimension of the pipeline industry: from the metallurgy and quality control in the manufacturing of pipe, to pipeline construction processes, maintenance, leak detection, monitoring, and spill response. New Infrastructure At the front end, pipeline companies building new infrastructure today

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Oil and Gas Companies Face Challenges During the Winter Months

The winter weather creates a number of hindrances on refinery operations, pipelines, and railways, causing the nation’s energy infrastructure to deliver much-needed fuel to demanding markets while working around winter’s obstacles. Refineries and Transportation Many refineries have had to halt operations due to power outages and the physical effect of the cold on operating units.

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Landslide Damage Can Be Repaired

For engineers who work on pipelines, there are external threats to be aware of and respond to. Lines that cross through hilly or mountainous terrain are susceptible to land movement or subsidence. Studying the terrain and the types of landmass movement is essential for engineers and geologists; they can play a role in determining where

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7 Winter Weather Construction Safety Tips from Construct Connect

Originally published on January 17, 2018, by Kendall Jones (https://www.constructconnect.com/blog/7-winter-weather-construction-safety-tips) Construction doesn’t stop when winter weather strikes, so it’s important to know what steps to take to keep your workers warm and safe. As another major winter storm is starting to impact areas of the country this week with snow and ice accumulation, it’s a

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Stopping the Danger Before It Starts: Preventing Exposed Pipelines

The U.S. has over 2.5 million miles of pipelines crisscrossing the country. As existing lines grow older, critics warn that the risk of accidents could increase. Many pipelines transport petroleum products and natural gas, and some pipelines transport other hazardous products such as chemicals, highly volatile liquids, anhydrous ammonia, or carbon dioxide. Exposure to these

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How Are Pipelines Replaced?

Nearly 50% of the U.S. pipeline system is 40 years old or older. As recently as 2016, the federal Department of Transportation (DOT) estimated 30,000 miles of cast-iron pipe still carried gas in the United States, with the highest percentage of these mains located in older eastern cities such as New York City, Philadelphia, Boston,

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